A NEW Form of MAGNESIUM: Can it help Brain Fog and FM Pain?

Background

Cognitive function tends to declines as we age. For most people the decline is modest. This “semi-normal” decline is thought to be due to a decrease in the ability of cells to communicate with each other through connections called synapses. A similar defect is seen with Alzheimer’s disease.

Magnesium for fibromyalgia
Magnesium for fibromyalgia

Animal studies show that one way to increase the number and function of synapses is to raise the brain’s level of the mineral magnesium. When scientists increase brain magnesium in lab rats, the rats become smarter. They can think more rapidly and accurately than they did before.

But, most forms of oral magnesium don’t pass easily from the blood into the brain. An exception is a new form of magnesium developed by a research team from MIT specifically for the purpose of passing from the blood into the brain. This form is magnesium threonate,.  It is being developed by Neurocentria, Inc., a pharmaceutical company, under the brand name of MMFS-01.

The Study

Neurocentria’s team recently published a very important study. Their results strongly suggest that MMFS-01 can substantially improve mild cognitive function in aging humans.  MMFS-01 is not yet commercially available.  However, a “generic” magnesium threonate is available from the Life Extension Foundation under the brand name of Neuro-mag. Likely other “generics” are or will soon be available.

What is truly remarkable about the MMFS-01 study is that improvement in over-all cognitive function was seen within just six weeks. Improvement continued through 12 weeks, the full length of the study.  Subjects treated with placebo did not improve overall.

Volunteers for the Neurocentria study were age 50 to 70. All had test score evidence of mild cognitive impairment. Twenty five subjects took MMFS-01 and 26 took placebo. The treatment dose was between 1.5 and 2.0 grams per day in divided doses.  Four different cognitive tests were taken before treatment and again at six and twelve weeks. These tests measured executive function, working memory, attention and a concept called episodic memory.

Findings: With magnesium threonate executive function significantly improved compared to placebo at 6 and 12 weeks.  Working memory improved significantly at six weeks but at 12 weeks the placebo group had improved also. So, the difference for working memory was no longer statistically significant.  Attention improved in the MMFS-01 group compared to baseline, but this improvement was not statistically better than for those taking placebo.  Episodic memory improved with MMFS-01 by week 12, but was not significantly better than that seen with placebo.

However, when overall cognitive ability was calculated by combining results from the four tests, subjects taking MMFS-01 scored significantly better than subjects taking placebo. This was true at week 6 (P=.017) and at week 12 (p=.003).  As important, subjects taking MMFS-01 who had the greatest increase in red blood cell magnesium levels were alsomost likely to show major cognitive improvement. There were no major side effects.

Separate research suggests that magnesium might also help for fibromyalgia pain. This benefit might be because magnesium tends to inhibit the activity of NMDA receptors. Activation of NMDA receptors is believed to be one mechanism that creates fibromyalgia pain.  A recent open label study from Mayo Clinic found that transdermal magnesium chloride spray taken twice daily for 3 weeks was followed by a reduction in fibromyalgia pain.

Take Home Thoughts

Should physicians treating FM or ME-CFS “brain fog” by offer magnesium threonate as a potential treatment?  The arguments against: 1) We don’t know whether brain fog in fibromyalgia or ME-CFS has any relationship to the cognitive decline that is common with aging. 2)  We have only one clinical study to support the beneficial effects of magnesium threonate.

The argument for: 1) Brain fog is a major problem for our patients 2) We have no proven treatments 3)  For most (but not all patients), side effects from magnesium are minimal—mainly diarrhea if we get the dose up too high.

Should patients with FM or ME-CFS try magnesium threonate on their own?  I strongly recommend that all patients work with their doctor.  Certain patients should not take extra magnesium, especially those with any degree of kidney dysfunction.  Also, it would be useful to obtain a baseline red blood cell magnesium level and to monitor that level as treatment proceeds.

Since MMFS-01 is not available, using Life Extension’s or other generic equivalents is reasonable.  Of course, ideally, some angel would fund a proper controlled study. But, as usual, that’s not likely to happen anytime soon.

If any readers decide to work with their doctors and try magnesium threonate, I and other readers would be grateful to learn whether or not it helped. In the absence of research funding the best way for us to learn which treatments help will be for each of us to report our personal anecodatal experience along to each other.  We look forward to your comments.

3 thoughts on “A NEW Form of MAGNESIUM: Can it help Brain Fog and FM Pain?”

  1. far from new,Ive been using Neuro-Mag for 2+ years.It does help keep my magnesium levels up.Doctor said it crossed the blood/brain barrier and it would work better than other mag supplement because of that. Fibro is still debilitating at time,but Im sure it would be worse if I didnt take this

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